The Truth Is

Despite the age of Euripedes’ play, and the fact that the events it refers to take place almost a thousand years before his own work, it’s striking how little has changed. For all our technological progress, as a species, the same abuses continue to the modern day. Slavery- whether in the form of debt bondage or sexual servitude- persists, and, of course, violence towards women has never ended. In the contemporary era, the figure of Talthybius persists in new and different forms, and the sad truth is, as Hannah Arendt suggested, that evil is banal. Talthybius isn’t some monster; he’s all too human.


Call of Cassandra

This piece is my small contribution to ‘The Women of Troy’ project supporting the production put on by Eagles Nest Theatre Company. The initiative is to combat violence against women through creativity and collaboration.

We speak of violence against women, yet when we turn to our sisters we are largely oblivious that 1 in 5 of them have experienced sexual violence since the age of 15. More so, 1 in 3 have experienced physical violence and the chances were that this was in their home; a place of safety and refuge.

“Violence against women was endemic to warlike society 2500 years ago. The threat of war is no longer prevalent for most first world citizens, but the level to which women across the globe are subjected to violence in their private and personal spaces is nothing short of an epidemic” (Eagles Nest Theatre Co.).

Have we not evolved beyond this?
It shakes the skeletons of my mother’s mothers to think that their trauma has brought no change.
It leaches into the spirits of our boys brought into this world through wombs whose memories tell dark stories. It tarnishes our future when these boys perpetually continue the cycle of all they’ve glimpsed through dungeons behind dull eyes.
It leaves rusty red stains when women hold the hands of the perpetrators, of any gender, and stand idle with clenched sledgehammer jaws.

Maybe change is coming…
Maybe the village can help.
Let’s tell our stories and hold hands while the elders sing songs of healing.
Maybe the songs will carry into the valleys and over the hills and far away.
Maybe the songs will spread far and wide;
And maybe they will go down in history and be sung in another 250 years time when things are better. Maybe things will be better.

Casualties

A spoken word piece about the daily fear that women face walking home at night. Dedicated to all the women who have lost their lives at the hands of a man.

MEDEA by Euripides

The tale of Medea’s vicious revenge killing of her children strikes at symbols deeply rooted in our culture. Medea is a feminist hero – cutting off patriarchal power at is source as she steals Jason’s heirs. Equally she is a demon witch and personification of the havoc wreaked by uncontrolled emotions.

The workshop explores key characters scenes as well as questions about the chorus and stylistics of Greek drama

Of all creatures that have life and will, we women are the most wretched

Price

$17 per student (minimum total fee $1,700)

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MEDEA 2019 by Euripides

AVAILABLE NOW!

Performance

The tale of Medea is dark and potent like a witches brew. It is so epically tragic that without seeing the text brought to life by performers, it is difficult to imagine it as a plausible reality. Our production uses an elegant minimalistic design as a meeting point between the world of the Greeks and our own.  This ensures that nothing distracts from the story of a woman’s rage when facing a world of misogyny and a battle that is fought at the cost of our innocence.

Workshop

The performance we offer is obviously a feminist reading of both the character of Medea and the play. In the workshop key scenes are used to explore a range of other readings including ones that depict Medea or the folly of human emotion as the cause of the tragedy. Additionally, we investigate how the role of the chorus might be variously interpreted. 

Of all creatures that have life and will, we women are the most wretched

Prices

Short performance only $13 (minimum total fee $1300)
Short performance + workshop $16
(minimum total fee $1600)

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MACBETH by William Shakespeare

Performance

When an evil person gets what’s coming to them there is no tragedy. This production focuses on the familiar- ity and banality of having desires and ambitions, and how unchecked they can lead to consequences beyond imagination. We focus on the journey of a loving couple, who each want the other to achieve their dreams, but ultimately destroy everything they care about, themselves, and each other.

Workshop

Students are guided to critique the performance, ask questions and delve deeper into interpretive practice by looking at the couple’s relationship, and other monologues as time permits. The scene between Macbeth and “His Wife” before Duncan is murdered is used to explore gender, manipulation, and power. The “unsex me here” monologue continues the discussion about gender introducing ideas about frailty and the supernatural. The “two truths” monologue offers an opportunity for a play full of ambition in tangible, contemporary terms.

“Let not light see my black and deep desires”

Prices

Short performance only $9.50 /pp (minimum total fee $950 )
Short performance + workshop $11.50 /pp  (minimum total fee $1,150 )

Book Online and Save 5%NO CREDIT CARD REQUIRED

MACBETH 2019 by William Shakespeare

Performance

When an evil person gets what’s coming to them there is no tragedy. In production focuses on the humanity and normality of having desires and ambitions and naively taking a wrong step only to find ourselves embroiled in consequences beyond our worst imagining. We focus on the journey of a loving couple, who want the other to achieve their desires, but ultimately destroy everything they care about, themselves, and each other. 

Workshop

Students are guided to critique the performance, ask questions and delve deeper into interperative practice by looking at the couple’s relationship and other monologues as time permits. For example, the scene between Macbeth and “His Wife” before Duncan is murdered is used to explore readings involving gender, manipulation and power. The “unsex me here” monologue continues the discourse about gender and frailty as well as introducing the role of the supernatural. And last but not least, using the “two truths are told” monologue we ask students to look at ambition and desires from a practical, contemporary, point of view.  

“Let not light see my black and deep desires”

Prices

Short performance only $9 (minimum total fee $900)
Short performance + workshop $11 (minimum total fee $1100)

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ROMEO AND JULIET by William Shakespeare

Performance

“I saw Shakespeare, it wasn’t hard, and don’t tell anyone but I may have even liked it.” This is the sort of thing we hear from students after this show. The dramatic style mirrors the narrative, creating an exciting ride for our young audiences. They are drawn into reckless abandon, a world of period costumes, playful sword fights and comedic characters, as Romeo and Juliet fall in love. But then of course the joy and frivolity ruptures and fades as the tragedy sets in and we all fall together.

Workshop

Students are guided to ask questions and talk about the performance; what they understood, what they liked or didn’t. We often hear the comment that Romeo and Juliet is a play about two dumb teenagers and lust. We explore this idea so students see how what seems to be an off-hand comment could form the basis of a valid reading. Then we challenge this idea by looking at different portrayals of the main characters that might make the love-at-first-sight narrative more appealing. Where time and the level of the group permits, we also look at how creative choices can be used to explore essay prompts such as “Who is to blame?” and “Is love or hate the more powerful force?”

“O teach me how I should forget to think”

Prices

Short performance only $9.50/pp  (minimum total fee $950 )
Short performance + workshop $11.50/pp  (minimum total fee $1150 )

Book Online and Save 5%NO CREDIT CARD REQUIRED

ROMEO AND JULIET 2019 by William Shakespeare

Performance

“I saw Shakespeare, it wasn’t hard and dont tell anyone but I may have even liked it.” This is the sort of thing we want to hear when students see this show. The dramatic style of this performance mirrors the narrative, creating an exciting ride for our young audiences. Initially they are drawn into reckless abandon, in a world of period costumes, playful sword fights and comedic characters, as Romeo and Juliet fall in love only to have the joy and frivolity fade as the tragedy sets in and we all fall together.

Workshop

Students are guided to ask questions and talk about the performance; what they understood, what they liked or didn’t. We often hear the comment that Romeo and Juliet is a play about two dumb teenagers and lust. We explore this idea so students see how what seems to be an off-hand comment could form the basis of a valid reading. Then we challenge this idea by looking at different portrayals of the main characters that might make the love-at-first-sight narrative more appealing. Where time and the level of the group permits we also look at how creative choices can be used to explore essay prompts such as “Who is to blame?” and “Is love or hate the more powerful force?”

“O teach me how I should forget to think”

Prices

Short performance only $9 (minimum total fee $900)
Short performance + workshop $11 (minimum total fee $1100)

Book Now

WOMEN OF TROY by Euripides

Performance

The screams of the of the women of Troy reverberate through time, echoing into the contemporary world. This stylised ensemble piece is a great introduction to the story of the Trojan War but also draws our attention how parable functions in Greek drama through archetype and myth. The tales of Hecuba, Helen, Cassandra, Andromache, and Talthibius become representations of familiar character and social types and categories. The result is a powerful, cathartic production the reaches out to young audiences making this ancient tale relevant and immediate.

Workshop

Through questions and replaying scenes we examine how directorial choices in the production eclipse and highlight certain themes in the text. Alternative readings of Talthibius and Helen tease out mechanisms of institutional violence and the dynamics of relationships shaped by seductive power and the concept of ‘the vixen’. Where time permits, we examine how dramatic moments may have achieve a different of cathartic effect by highlighting individual character voices and less symbolic dramatic choices.

“The mortal who sacks fallen cities is a fool, his own turn must come”

Price

$17 per student  (minimum total fee $1700 )

Book Online and Save 5%NO CREDIT CARD REQUIRED