THE CRUCIBLE by Arthur Miller

(Studied in comparison to The Dressmaker by Rosalie Ham)

At first glance the contrast between the comedy of one and the high drama horror of the other is glaring. But there are obvious similarities too. Both are set in small-town frontier communities, riddled with political alliances and hidden tales of infidelity, resulting in a woman being scapegoated. Both explore deceit, guilt, and the loss of identity.

Contrasting ‘The Crucible’ and ‘The Dress Maker’ exposes elements their stylistic differences. The hysteria in The Crucible has farcelike qualities as did McCarthy’s own ‘witch trials’. The grotesque comedy of ‘The Dressmaker’ is counterpointed and sharpened by sitting against the backdrop of tragic and sinister aspects of ‘The Crucible’.

Our workshops will explore some of these themes as well as examining points of comparison between the two texts’ characters.

Because it is my face, and it is yours

Price

 $17 per student (minimum total fee $1,700)

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PHOTOGRAPH 51 by Anna Ziegler

(Studied in comparison to The Penelopiad by Margaret Atwood)

Various feminist movements comment that history is really HIS-story; the stories of men told at the expense of the female voice: if Homer’s Odyssey can be thought of as the father of all stories, Atwood’s ‘Penelopiad’ weaves a new archetypal womens’ tale. Atwood has been a powerful force in writing the female voice and has undoubtedly been an inspiration to Ziegler in her own efforts to tell the stories

of contemporary women. Photograph 51 rewrites the story of the discovery of DNA, highlighting the role of Rosalind Franklin in a discovery conventionally attributed to James Watson and Francis Crick.

Franklin and Penelope are not the same archetypal woman but despite being thousands of years apart, there are frighteningly common threads of sexism that only become obvious when we continue the project of telling HER-stories.

Price

$17 per student (minimum total fee $1,700)

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THE SEVEN STAGES OF GRIEVING by Debra Mailman & Wesley Enoch

(Studied in comparison to The Longest Memory by Fred Daguiar)

The Seven Stages of Grieving is a pastiche of voices and performative styles. It is a dynamic and contemporary work of art incorporating aspects of traditional Western theatre and indigenous performance genres. It represents the common struggles of the diverse aboriginal, indigenous, first nations, blackfulla, and mob communities in their united battle to be seen, heard, recognised, and treated as equals.

The Longest Memory has stylistic similarities. It is a  multi-perspectival work including a range of literary styles. It deals with a narrative of oppressions which is much more familiar; the violence, abuse, and power dynamics of American slavery.

The Comparative reading of these two texts is profoundly insightful. It offers an opportunity to increase awareness of the brutality of Australian history and provides the foundation to understanding the almost incomprehensible expressions of pain in The Seven Stages of Grieving.

The workshop will involve performed readings from both texts, discussion with your students, and the sharing of personal insights from the the indigenous cast, which might otherwise be missed by non-indigenous audiences. 

Price

$17 per student (minimum total fee $1,700)

Book Online and Save 5%NO CREDIT CARD REQUIRED